Kerry Witcher

Profile – Kerry Witcher

President, UT Foundation

My position includes…

responsibility for alumni, development and advancement service operations for the University of Tennessee.

To understand what I do, you must understand …

that we provide tools, resources and opportunity for a dedicated staff across the Foundation. We have internal customers through the campuses and institutes across the system, as well as the 400,000+ alumni and friends we strive to serve externally. In addition, I have more “bosses” than the average person.

I advance the mission of the university by …

working with a team of professionals and volunteers from across the system to help generate financial, public and political support for the University of Tennessee.

When I grew up I wanted to be …

a professional golfer. If you’ve ever seen me play, you certainly understand why my career went in a totally different direction.

If I was gifted with a secret power it would be …

the power to heal. Of course, the first thing that comes to mind is the healing of illness and pain. Thinking really big here, I would include the power to heal emotional stress, distrust and broken relationships.

I start my day by…

getting up at 5:00 am and walking a couple of miles. I follow this by drinking several cups of coffee over the next few hours.

My bucket list includes …

attending all four of the “major” golf tournaments on the pro tour. I’ve made it to three of them: the Masters, the U.S. Open and the PGA Championship. The next step is trying to convince my wife we need to go to the British Open.

My theme song is …

Don’t Stop Believin’ by Journey

I learned the meaning of giving from …

My grandmother. The woman truly had a servant’s heart, and spent every day of her life trying to do something for other people.

Few know that I …

was a manager for the UT baseball team in college. I literally did a bit of everything, from helping with field maintenance to running the scoreboard. At that time, it was a manual scoreboard, which included climbing up and “hanging” the score on the board after each inning.